Grieving your child on Fathers’ Day – article from What’s Your Grief

Grieving your child on Fathers’ Day – article from What’s Your Grief

Father’s Day is one of the many days that the loss of a child feels even more profound. Although as bereaved parents are keenly aware, a child’s absence is felt every day.

The amazing blog ‘What’s your grief? asked fathers to share their Father’s Day grief and their responses will resonate with bereaved dads at SLOW and beyond.

Here’s the full article and a selection of their responses:

You will always have that open space in your soul, for that’s where you store the memories.

 

You will never truly be done grieving; you will learn to live and cope.

 

There will come a day when you will look back and see the goods before the bads.

 

I am an amputee, a father without a son.  THAT is my new normal.

 

I may look the same as before Kylie died but I’m a different man altogether.

 

The weight of loss never goes away, we just learn to carry it.

And for the non-bereaved, how should you acknowledge Father’s Day?  Our advice from SLOW is if you know a grieving dad, pay them a visit or make that phone call to tell them that you are thinking about them and their child.

Be kind to yourself on Father’s Day and if you need support the SLOW support groups are open to all that have lost a child and parents can come at any time after the death of their child.  For times and dates of forthcoming SLOW support groups link here.

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My daughter died when she was seven. I still get waves of terrible grief today

My daughter died when she was seven. I still get waves of terrible grief today

Tim has written about the loss of Naomi and his experience of managing to continue through the grief. He also talks about the help from Helen and Douglas House and also the support group for bereaved dads he started.

It’s been eleven years since Naomi died and I still get sudden waves of terrible grief. But in this group we find real comfort in one another. Some of us have been on real journeys, had relationships break-up and come back together, had more children,  all the things that happen in life. But this is a place where we can bring our relationships with our dead children – it just goes on.

The article was published in this Tuesday’s Telegraph and you can read the article here.

If are looking for support groups in London please get in touch using the details below or take a look at our calendar of events here.

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